Day 2 Continued, The Heard Museum

After leaving the Desert Botanical Garden, we found a Japanese market with deliciously refrigerated rice balls and tasty bottled teas.  I had two rice balls, one with tunafish and one with pickled kelp. It was very refreshing.

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The Heard Museum, Phoenix AZ

Then we went to the Heard Museum. The Heard Museum is not a history museum, it is a living museum featuring both artifacts and contemporary art. The overall mission is to educate the public about the living cultures and native peoples of the Southwest.

The Heard Museum is a great resource and has a mix of educational, historical exhibits and galleries of current artists.

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The Day Mother Shook (2011) – Oliver Enjady, Mescalero Apache b. 1952

This was one of the most striking paintings I saw. It depicts the first atom bomb testing on July 16th, 1945, upwind of Apache lands.

The plaque next to the painting reads, The Mescalero Reservation is downwind of the Trinity Site, where the first atomic bomb was tested in 1945. The artist states, “the elders believe the bomb has given cancer to the earth and to women from Mescalero, where there is a high incidence of the pathology. I think Manifest Destiny is still happening.” Enjady lost his mother to caner.

Seeing this painting made me think about the ways in which we can passively take part in ethnic cleansing.

The Heard Museum was another place I didn’t feel like I was able to spend enough time in to truly absorb everything it offered. It was an incredibly interesting and worthwhile experience nonetheless. I wholeheartedly encourage anyone in Phoenix to visit the museum and the Desert Botanical Garden to learn about and experience the area. I feel like I could go back to both places and find something new I hadn’t noticed or paid enough attention to before.

 

 

After the museum closed on us, literally – we were the last ones out, we hit the road to drive to Arcosanti, where we would be spending the night.

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On the road to Arcosanti

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